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    Right here! ACS Valves manufactures all the rotary valve parts and accessories you might need. You can browse what we have on our site, check out technical brochures, or call one of our sales reps directly to determine exactly what you need.

    Relevant for: Technical Support
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    If your rotary valve is not rotating, it could be an issue with the power, the chain, the gearbox, or a foreign object stuck in the valve’s inlet.

    If it’s stuck because of material buildup, there are a few different areas to look at: inspect the supply source and the piping of your conveying line. The issue could also be related to excessive pocket fill, moisture, or blowby air.

    These are all specific issues, so check your maintenance manual for more in-depth troubleshooting tips.

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    You know what they say about squeaky wheels! It’s possible your rotor needs replacing: in our experience, the culprit is usually decreased rotor clearances.

    It’s possible you’re also dealing with a mechanical problem with the drive chain or drive shaft, or some kind of foreign object is jammed inside.

    Check your rotary valve maintenance manual for help with troubleshooting and repair.

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    Absolutely not! ACS is fully bonded, and we’re partnered with a company that picks up shipments daily. For you, that means no delays, customs duties or brokerage fees.

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    Sometimes the rotation of the rotor is reduced due to an overload of material, or larger pieces of material being fed through the valve, jamming in the clearances. In this case, shear pin sprockets will shear the pin on the sprocket, reducing the risk of damage to the rotor.

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    Too much clearance between the rotor, endplates and or housing can result in air loss. Measure the rotor to endplate and rotor to housing clearances to confirm that they are an NFPA compliant 0.0079 inches. If the clearance is larger than this, it might be time to replace your rotor, rotary valve, or have it sent back to ACS for a repair or evaluation. Make sure to stick to a maintenance schedule and check your clearances at least every three months.

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    The capped pipe is called a housing vent port. Rotor pockets can sometimes contain a volume of pressured air, which can impede material flow into the airlock inlet, reducing your efficiency. Also, in conveying systems that run at 6 PSI and higher, large releases of air up the return side of the airlock can cause pulsing in the material flow into the conveying line. Using a vent helps solve both of these issues, and is also helpful in improving your fill efficiency.

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    Shear protectors reduce the flow of material at the valve's inlet. Reduced flow allows for better pocket fill and also reduces the risk of product jams in your housing clearances–ultimately protecting your product from damage.