Frequently Asked Questions

  • Q.

    Why do we recommend a shear protector for pellets, flakes or beads?

    A.

    Shear protectors reduce the flow of material at the valve’s inlet. Reduced flow allows for better pocket fill and also reduces the risk of product jams in your housing clearances—ultimately protecting your product from damage. 

    Posted by Terri Shipstone
  • Q.

    Why use a shear pin sprocket with sawdust or wood fines?

    A.

    Sometimes the rotation of the rotor is reduced due to an overload of material, or larger pieces of material being fed through the valve, jamming in the clearances. In this case, shear pin sprockets will shear the pin on the sprocket, reducing the risk of damage to the rotor.       

    Posted by Terri Shipstone
  • Q.

    My valve is losing too much air, what could be the problem?

    A.

    Too much clearance between the rotor, endplates and or housing can result in air loss. Measure the rotor to endplate and rotor to housing clearances to confirm that they are an NFPA compliant 0.0079 inches. If the clearance is larger than this, it might be time to replace your rotor, rotary valve, or have it sent back to ACS for a repair or evaluation. Make sure to stick to a maintenance schedule and check your clearances at least every three months.    

    Posted by Nena Dallas
  • Q.

    What is this capped pipe that is sticking out of the side of my valve?

    A.

    The capped pipe is called a housing vent port. Rotor pockets can sometimes contain a volume of pressured air, which can impede material flow into the airlock inlet, reducing your efficiency. Also, in conveying systems that run at 6 PSI and higher, large releases of air up the return side of the airlock can cause pulsing in the material flow into the conveying line. Using a vent helps solve both of these issues, and is also helpful in improving your fill efficiency.    

    Posted by Brittany Dollimore